…like Karen Carpenter fronting The Smashing Pumpkins,” Jo Bevan (Desperate Journalist)

Hurtling are Jen Macro, Jon Clayton and Simon Kobayashi.

 

They are sometimes dreamy, they are sometimes noisy.

 

Heavily influenced by 90s alt-rock, Hurtling's pop sensibilities are bathed/drowned in loud guitars (Jen) and intricate basslines (Simon) all underpinned by driving drums (Jon). Taking inspiration from bands such as The Breeders, Sebadoh and Throwing Muses 

but make a sound all their own, the three members of the band are seasoned professionals. Lead singer/guitarist Jen Macro has played and sung live with a number of respected artists including My Bloody Valentine and Graham Coxon. Drummer

Jon Clayton has run OneCat Studio in Brixton for over 10 years and has worked with artists including Jim Bob (Carter USM), Charlotte Hatherley, The Monochrome Set and Chris T-T and both Jon and Jen wrote, performed and produced in Something Beginning L. Simon Kobayashi (Bass) is founding member of Smallgang and Splintered Man and has lent his musical talents to Shonen Knife, Bitch Magnet and Kath Bloom.

 

The band started life when Jen returned from touring as keyboard player and guitarist with My Bloody Valentine. Having written a handful of songs whilst on the road, she then started to muck around with them in Jon's OneCat Studio where Jon took up the (unusual for him) position of drummer. The project picked up momentum when Simon joined the duo, and the three piece started to venture into live performances towards the latter part of 2015.

Download single 'Summer' out now

Debut album 'Future From Here' is released on October 18th, 2019, on Onomatopoeia Records.

For press enquiries please contact Sam Chamberlaine - sam@369press.com

REVIEWS:

"Hurtling Future From Here (Onomatopoeia): Hurtling are a London trio formed and fronted by My Bloody Valentine’s keyboard-player Jen Macro. Their sound draws from pre-grunge quiet-loud-quiet-loud acts like The Pixies, but they have as much in common with contemporary outfits such as Wolf Alice. Their sound, in fact, boasts variety, at least within an indie guitar rock context. Macro holds the whole thing together with a voice capable of whispering vulnerably or centring a storm. “Noise-pop” the press release calls it but it’s not really properly cacophonic, just amplified and loud when they need to make a point. Primarily, it showcases songwriting skills alongside imaginative instrumentation and arrangements." theartsdesk.com